iPhone Photography: Apple’s investment in camera technology is paying off

Apple has been working hard to improve the camera ever since it realized iPhones were becoming more popular than cameras.

Other smartphones try to offer more megapixels, but that’s only part. It doesn’t matter how big your images are if you don’t have software to optimize them, hardware to improve them, services through which to share them or powerful image management tools to help you make the best of them.

Apple realized that taking good images isn’t just about the size of the CCD, it also depends on the software, flash, hardware processing, depth of field and everything else.

“The iPhone 8 Plus is the best-performing mobile device camera we have ever tested.”DxOMark.


iPhone Photography

Apple continues to develop (or acquire) technologies with implications on photography:

  • Some depend on hardware, such as its dual camera sensor.
  • Others depend on software (Photos, image processing).
  • Other innovations (item and face recognition, for example) depend on a combination of software and hardware.
  • The Portrait-taking improvements are winning high praise everywhere.
  • Besides, the photographs you take on iPhone can easily be synced and improved on a high configuration Mac.
  • Images are no moving into three dimensions — four if you are one of those who sees AR as a portal to an augmented planet.

“Apple’s all-new front-facing TrueDepth camera puts the company up to two-and-a-half years ahead of the competition,” says top Apple analyst, Ming-Chi Kuo of KGI says

In the future, Apple will continue the move towards new image formats, something that can pack images, sound, location and video as well. Every single one of these photo-focused improvements combined gives Apple a tremendous platform advantage — not just in photography, but also in terms of the future of photography (still images and video combined). And Apple has not even started using AI to figure out things like aesthetics, sharpness, color and more.

All these will help iPhoneographers get more out of the images they already have.

And all of this is planned by Apple, nothing is accidental.

“We’re in a time where the greatest advances in camera technology are happening as much in the software as in the hardware. And that obviously plays to Apple’s strengths over traditional camera companies,” Apple’s marketing chief, Philip Schiller, said.

The idea now is that you can pick up an iPhone and capture great images — and video — without needing to spend time learning how to use the device.

Source: Computerworld

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